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Time to say goodbye

The Last Game

Nolan Dalla and Peter Alson Excerpted from the book, ONE OF A KIND by Nolan Dalla and Peter Alson

On November 11, 1998, 45-year-old Stuey Ungar, five-foot-five and barely a hundred pounds, charged across the shining marble floor of the Bellagio’s grand entrance with a bounce to his step and a wad of cash in his pocket. It would have been a real stretch to call him The Kid at this point, though from a distance his Beatle haircut and boyish frame still gave the impression of youth. Up close, he looked like what he was; a longtime drug addict whose excesses were now written in his face. The ravaged nose was the most disturbing feature, one side of it deflated like a bad flat tire.Still Stuey was excited to be making his first foray into the Las Vegas’ newest and most spectacular hotel.

It was a different world than the one he had arrived in thirty years earlier, when the town was mostly run by the mob. But at the heart of it, no matter how it was dressed up or presented, no matter how corporate it might have become, or how much like a theme park, the blood that pulsed through the veins of Vegas was still gambling blood.Stuey walked into the poker room, where he met up with Mike Sexton. The two of them briefly discussed what game Stuey should play. Sexton knew how badly Stuey needed to hang onto the money that Baxter had given him for a little while if he was going to have any chance of getting back on his feet. “Don’t blow it all in one big game,” Sexton cautioned him. “Start off playing $200-$400 limit.”Even in the shape he was in, Stuey’s ego prevented him from thinking that small. He wanted to play in the biggest game around.“What about no limit?” Sexton offered. “That’s your strongest game. What if we got a no-limit game going?”Stuey agreed that made sense.“This was before no-limit was played widely in cash games the way it is today,” Sexton recalled. “It was still unusual to get a no-limit cash game going. Plus, as Stuey pointed out, who was going to want to play no-limit with him?”Erik Seidel, the former stockbroker turned poker pro and the runner-up to Johnny Chan in the 1998 WSOP, was sitting across the room, playing in what he termed a “very good Omaha game.” He got up and walked over to say hello to Stuey.

In the course of talking, Stuey mentioned that he was interested in playing no-limit, and Seidel said he’d consider playing a $5,000 head’s-up freezeout.“There’s nobody in the world I wouldn’t play head’s-up against,” Stuey said “But your one of the few that would give me a tough time. I’ll tell you what, I’ll give you a hundred bucks to play me.”It was pure, classic Stuey bravado. Seidel laughed, thinking that even though Stuey had lost some of the spark he’d once had, there was a hopeful feeling seeing him there that day. “Like maybe he could give up the drugs. Like maybe he really was back and this could be another chance.”In the end, Seidel decided he didn’t want to get up from the game he was in just yet. But as soon as he walked off, Stuey and sexton looked around and saw Melissa Hayden, one of the strongest women poker players in the world at that time. Sexton said, “You want to play a freezeout?” and Hayden said, “Sure.”Sexton laughed and said to Stuey, “See, you’ve been out of action so long you got girls that want to play against you.”The cardroom manager found Stuey and Hayden an empty table and set them up with a dealer and chips. Melissa wanted to start off with a $2000 freezeout, but Stuey insisted it be $5000, and she finally agreed.

They sat down in the expensive swiveling upholstered seats and watched the dealer fan a deck across the felt face up. Stuey reveled in the moment: the nonstop musical chatter of the chips being shuf-fled, bet and dragged, was as soothing to him as the sound of an ocean wave, a burbling brook. He was back in action.The game started with $25 and $50 blinds. Hayden, a tall, attractive red head, who had been a professional photographer back in New York before moving to Las Vegas to concentrate on poker, recalled that “Everyone who knew Stuey was concerned about him. There was a feeling of wanting to protect him.”That noble sentiment didn’t stop Hayden from trying to beat Stuey’s brains in. In fact, forty-five minutes after they began, Hayden had won every chip on the table. Someone from the high-limit table next to them, said, “Aw, Stuey, letting a girl beat you.”“When the guy said that,” Hayden recalled, “Stuey leaned over and whispered to me, ‘Don’t let them get to you. Don’t ever let them get to you. That guy’s a piece of shit.’ and he was. He was a guy who was known to have beaten up his girlfriend.

I mean, you had to know Stuey to really appreciate what a gentleman he Intelligent Gambler 2♠was, and how much he loved women. He was extremely gallant in his way.”By this time, a couple of other players had wandered over, and a non-freezeout no-limit game began at the table with the same $25-$50 blinds. Erik Seidel got up from his Omaha game and joined in. The painful truth was that Stuey was the “live one” in the game. “Yeah, that game was pretty much built around him,” Seidel said.The members of the poker fraternity might’ve been rooting for Stuey to get his life back on track, but the sympathy stopped as soon as the cards were dealt.It was no easy lineup under any circumstances. Aside from Hayden and Seidel, the other players included Russian poker pro Ralph Perry, the young gun Daniel Negreanu, and Perry Green, the Alaskan fur trader who’d been runner-up to Stuey in the 198 World Series final.“It was strange that Perry Green was there,” observed Melissa Hayden. “He didn’t live in Las Vegas, and it was unusual to see him. It was a little eerie, to tell you the truth, almost like the completion of some kind of circle.”

Stuey was far from the top of his game. Hayden said he seemed “very edgy. His focus and attention weren’t good.” Playing impatiently and aggressively, he bluffed off most of the $25,000 in a few hours. Hayden said she didn’t think that he lost all of it. “I think he probably kept some of it to buy dope.”The game was still going when Stuey got up. As he was leaving the poker room, he saw Mike Sexton again, and the two chatted briefly. sexton was under the impression that Stuey had not lost everything, and he interpreted his departure as a positive sign, demonstrating that he had some discipline and patience, and that he would try to find a better spot the next day.

Stuey made his way out of the Bellagio’s north side exit. He walked past the already famous fountains, the 1,200 multi-colored jets of water that danced in computer choreographed rhythm high above the quarter-mile-long lake fronting the hotel along the Strip. Stuey stopped to watch for a minute, standing alongside the large crowd of vacationing families, tourists, and convention-goers who stared up in awe a the majestic geysers leaping 240 feet toward the heavens while the giant loudspeakers piped out the sounds of Sarah Brightman and Andre Borcelli singing “Time to Say Goodbye”.

Canadian Jonahtan Duhamel wins WSOP 2010 Main Event

JONATHAN DUHAMEL WINS 2010 WSOP MAIN EVENT CHAMPIONSHIP

Jonathan Duhamel is the winner of the 2010 World Series of Poker Main Event Championship.

Duhamel, from Boucherville, Quebec became the first Canadian citizen in history to win poker’s world championship.  Two Canadians had previously finished in the runner-up spot in the 41-year-history of poker’s undisputed world championship.  Tuan Lam took second place in 2007, to Jerry Yang.  Fellow Canadian Howard Goldfarb did the same in 1995, losing to Dan Harrington.
Duhamel, a 23-year-old poker pro, collected a whopping $8,944,310 in prize money.  He was also presented with the widely-cherished and universally-revered gold and diamond-encrusted gold bracelet, representing the game’s sterling achievement.

The triumph was not easy.  Duhamel overcame a huge field of 7,319 entrants who entered what was the second-largest WSOP Main Event in history.  The tournament began on July 5th, and took more than four months to complete, including the customary recess prior to the November Nine.

Duhamel’s route to victory was a determined one, albeit peppered with a few unwanted detours.  He arrived at the final table — which began on Saturday, November 6th — with the chip lead.  He held about one-third of the total chips in play.  Duhamel lost some of his momentum during stage one of the finale, which included the elimination of seven players playing down to the final two.  Michael “the Grinder” Mizrachi seized the chip lead at one point during play, but ultimately finished fifth.  Joseph Cheong also proved to be a formidable foe during the long battle, but ended up as the third-place finisher.

Stage two of the November Nine’s grand finale was played on the main stage inside the Penn and Teller Theater at the Rio in Las Vegas.  The final duel was played to a packed house of nearly 2,000 spectators and a worldwide audience following the action over the Internet.  Millions more will watch the final crescendo of the WSOP Main Event on Tuesday night, when the championship premiers on ESPN television.  The two-hour program will debut at 7:00 pm PST.
The runner up was John Racener, from Port Richie, FL.  Despite the disappointment of defeat, he could take great pride in a noble effort that resulted in overcoming all but one of the more than 7,000 players who began the pursuit of ever poker player’s greatest dream.  Racener collected poker’s supreme consolation prize — $5,545,955 in prize money.

As the Canadian champion, Duhamel was only the sixth non-American to ever win the WSOP Main Event.  He followed in the hallowed footsteps of Mansour Matloubi (UK — 1990), Noel Furlong (Ireland — 1999), Carlos Mortensen (Spain — 2001), Joe Hachem (Australia (2005), and Peter Eastgate (Denmark — 2008).

 

WSOP Main Event Final Table 2010 Wrap-Up

Wow.

As we sit here on the stage absorbing what we’ve just seen, it’s hard to find words to close this day out properly. But we’ll try.

It was just after high noon when our November Nine filed onto the stage and into their seats under the bright lights of the made-for-TV set. They were soon engulfed by a crowd of close to 2,000 spectators all decked out in matching shirts, patched up like your grandfather’s trousers, and screaming multi-lingual cheers in unison at full throat. Bruce Buffer soon took the stage to utter the most famous words in poker, and suddenly a poker game broke out amidst all the madness and pomp.

It took 28 hands to find our first casualty of the day, and it was the amateur to fall first. Soi Nguyen was content to flip his {Q-Diamonds} {Q-Spades} against Jason Senti’s {A-Diamonds} {K-Clubs}, but a third queen on the flop was all she wrote for Nguyen.

The second victim was also sent packing on a coin flip, albeit an exciting coin flip. Michael Mizrachi’s {A-Diamonds} {Q-Diamonds} loved the {Q-Spades} {8-Diamonds} {Q-Diamonds} flop, but Matthew Jarvis’ {9-Clubs} {9-Hearts} liked the {9-Spades} turn a little bit better. It looked like he’d just saved his tournament life, but the {A-Spades} river gave the pot back to The Grinder and sent Jarvis off in eighth place.

Seven-handed play dragged on for an eternity, and Michael Mizrachi took advantage of the table to build himself a fairly sizable chip lead with more than 60 million. There were still seven when they broke for dinner just before 7pm. When they returned, yet another exciting (and similar) coin flip broke out. Jason Senti’s {A-Diamonds} {K-Spades} out-flopped Joseph Cheong’s {10-Clubs} {10-Spades} in a big way as the dealer rolled out {K-Diamonds} {K-Hearts} {Q-Clubs}. The turn {J-Diamonds} was a little sweat for Senti, and the river {9-Diamonds} was a total disaster. Cheong’s straight pushed his opponent straight out the door, and Senti collected seventh-place money on his way to the bar.

John Dolan fell next in sixth place, his {Q-Diamonds} {5-Diamonds} unable to win a race (imagine that, a race) against Jonathan Duhamel’s {4-Diamonds} {4-Clubs} despite turning 16 outs to survive.

The demise of Michael Mizrachi began when his {A-Diamonds} {8-Diamonds} doubled up John Racener’s {A-Spades} {K-Diamonds} to knock him out of the chip lead. A few minutes later, he doubled up Jonathan Duhamel on a big coin flip, and it all came crashing down a few minutes later. Jonathan Duhamel played his {A-Diamonds} {A-Clubs} slow, and he lured Mizrachi into a shove when his {Q-Diamonds} {8-Hearts} flopped top pair on the {5-Diamonds} {4-Spades} {Q-Clubs}. The chips went in, and there was no further help for Mizrachi, ending his near-legendary run in fifth place. That officially gives Frank Kassela the title of 2010 WSOP Player of the Year, incidentally.

Three hands later, the volatile Italian (who was surprisingly un-volatile today) fell in fourth place. Filippo Candio got his chips in with {K-Diamonds} {Q-Diamonds}, but he could not get there against Joseph Cheong’s {A-Clubs} {3-Clubs}. Cheong flopped an ace and made a wheel by the time it was all said and done, and Candio took just over $3 million for his efforts.

When they began three-handed play, Cheong and Duhamel were running away with the show. They were each approaching 100 million while John Racener sat patiently by with his 20-ish million. Cheong, however, was in no mood to sit patiently. He went to work quickly and was the first player to crest that magical 100-million-chip mark. He and Duhamel proceeded to wage all-out war hand after dramatic hand while Racener folded his buttons, sat on his hands, and waited for the fireworks.

And the fireworks, they came. In Hand #213, 25 hands into the three-way, a battle of the big-stacked blinds broke out. It started with Cheong opening the pot, and the betting action ended with him six-bet shoving all in with {A-Spades} {7-Hearts}. Duhamel probably didn’t like the idea of playing a 180-million-chip pot, but he didn’t waste any time calling with {Q-Clubs} {Q-Diamonds}, putting himself at risk in the process. There was no ace for Cheong, and he was crushed from 95 million all the way down to just ten. It was, as far as we can tell, the largest pot in the history of the WSOP!

Cheong doubled up once in the meanwhile, but six hands after the blowup, he was gone in third place. That’s good for more than $4 million, but it doesn’t come with a ticket to Monday’s finale.

There are only two of those, and they belong to Jonathan Duhamel and John Racener. For handicapping purposes, it’s Duhamel with the big chip lead, but don’t sleep on the short stack. Racener has been playing some fine poker of late, and his short-stack abilities were certainly on display here today.

There are 13 minutes, 52 seconds left in the current level, and the button was awarded to the big stack; Jonathan Duhamel will begin with position on Monday. We’re scheduled for an 8pm start here in Las Vegas.

It’s Duhamel. It’s Racener. It’s $8.9 million and the 2010 WSOP Main Event gold bracelet. Who ya got? Find out how the final chapter plays out right back here on Monday night.

WSOP ME 2010 Final Table, the story of Joseph Cheong or How to spew 5 Million dollars

JOSEPH CHEONG TAKES THIRD PLACE IN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

When they began three-handed play, Cheong and Duhamel were running away with the show. They were each approaching 100 million while John Racener sat patiently by with his 20-ish million. Cheong, however, was in no mood to sit patiently. He went to work quickly and was the first player to crest that magical 100-million-chip mark. He and Duhamel proceeded to wage all-out war hand after dramatic hand while Racener folded his buttons, sat on his hands, and waited for the fireworks.

And the fireworks, they came. In Hand #213, 25 hands into the three-way, a battle of the big-stacked blinds broke out. It started with Cheong opening the pot, and the betting action ended with him six-bet shoving all in with {A-Spades} {7-Hearts}. Duhamel probably didn’t like the idea of playing a 180-million-chip pot, but he didn’t waste any time calling with {Q-Clubs} {Q-Diamonds}, putting himself at risk in the process. There was no ace for Cheong, and he was crushed from 95 million all the way down to just ten. It was, as far as we can tell, the largest pot in the history of the WSOP!

This is how it played:

John Racener has the button.

Joseph Cheong raises to 2.9 million from the small blind after Racener folds his button. Jonathan Duhamel reraises from the big blind to 6.75 million. Cheong doesn’t buy it and four-bets to 14.25 million. Duhamel comes back with a five-bet to 22.75 million.

Cheong goes back and checks his hand while thinking about his decision. The room is completely silent while Cheong tanks. The crowd grows a bit restless after a minute or so, but settles back down before Cheong takes some more time. Cheong moves all in and Duhamel makes the call!

Duhamel: {Q-Clubs}{Q-Diamonds}
Cheong: {A-Spades}{7-Hearts}

Cheong moved all in for a massive 95.05 million! Duhamel has less chips. This pot also has a lot riding on it for John Racener, the bystander in the confrontation. Time for the flop…

The flop is spread, {9-Hearts}{3-Diamonds}{2-Clubs} and Cheong still needs to hit while Duhamel stays in front.

The turn brings the {6-Spades} and everyone in this room in on the edge of their seat awaiting the river card.

The river completes the board with the {8-Spades} and that’s it! The sea of red Montreal Canadians jerseys swarms Duhamel on the stage and begins the chant of, “Ole! Ole! Ole! Ole! Ole!” Cheong sits back in his chair to assist with the final and official count of the stacks. His cheering section stands stunned, many shaking their heads. Cheong was left with under 10 million in chips.

Cheong doubled up once in the meanwhile, but six hands after the blowup, he was gone in third place. That’s good for more than $4 million, but it doesn’t come with a ticket to Monday’s finale.

WSOP ME Final Table Heads Up, Duel in the Desert Racener vs Duhamel

DUEL IN THE DESERT:  DUHAMEL AND RACENER TO BATTLE FOR 2010 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

It’s Jonathan Duhamel vs. John Racener!

Note:  Press Conference with final two players is scheduled for the Rio Masquerade Stage, starting on Sunday at 1:00 pm.

Las Vegas, NV (November 7, 2010) — It’s taken four months, two days, and seven hours to reach poker’s ultimate showdown.

The two final green-felt gladiators in the quest to become the undisputed 2010 Wold Poker Champion are:

SEAT 1:  Jonathan Duhamel (Boucherville, Quebec) — 188,950,000 in chips

SEAT 2:  John Racener (Port Richey, FL) — 30,750,000 in chips

The crescendo of the November Nine reached its near-final furious finale when Jonathan Duhamel eliminated Jospeh Cheong on what turned out to be the final hand of Final Table — Day One.  The last hand was dealt at 1:49 am on Sunday AM.  The long 13-hour session included the elimination of seven players, leaving only Duhamel and Racener to compete in a heads-up duel for the world title.

Third-place finisher Joseph Cheong, from San Diego, CA collected $4,130,049 in prize money — a nice consolation prize, but a painful exit nonetheless from what was close to a nearly insurmountable chip lead at one point in at the final table.

The fourth-place finisher was Filippo Candio, from Sardinia, Italy.  As the first Italian player ever to make it to the Main Event Championship final table, Candio proudly collected $3,092,545.

The fifth-place finisher was Michael “the Grinder” Mizrachi, from Miami, FL.  Undisputedly the most famous and most accomplished of the final nine, Mizrachi suffered a blistering final hour when he went from chip leader to the rail, losing every key late hand of importance.  Mizrachi took some consolation in his payout, which amounted to $2332,992 in prize money.

The sixth-place finisher was John Dolan, from Bonita Springs, FL.  He ran card dead at the worst possible time, hopelessly falling victim to a bad run of cards in the later stages of play.  Dolan busted out when his bluff failed.  Nonetheless, he managed to scoop a monster-sized check from his initial $10,000 investment.  Dolan received $1,772,969 in prize money.

The seventh-place finisher was Jason Senti, from St. Louis Park, MN.  He began final table play with the shortest stack, but moved two spots up the money ladder.  Senti collected $1,356,720.

The eighth-place finisher was Matthew Jarvis, who took a terrible beat en route to a disappointing end result.  Jarvis was the victim of one of several astounding final table hands which resulted in a cyclone of emotional twists and turns and ultimately, chip lead changes.  Jarvis received $1,045,743 in prize money.

The ninth-place finisher was Soi Nguyen, from Santa Ana, CA.  The only amateur player among the final nine, Nguyen collected $811,823 in prize money — an incredible accomplishment considering this was his first time to cash in a major poker tournament.

The final duel of the Main Event is set to begin on Monday night.  Heads-up play will resume November 8th at 8 pm PST, when the final two survivors will play down to a winner.  Coverage of the final table will air in a two-hour telecast on Tuesday at 10 pm ET on ESPN.

The winner of this year’s WSOP Main Event, the second largest in the 40-year history of the WSOP with 7,319 entrants, will take home a staggering $8,944,310 in prize money.  He will also be presented with the most coveted achievement in all of poker — the World Series of Poker Main Event Championship gold bracelet.

So, who will become the 2010 world poker champion?

WSOP Main Event Final Table: The Heads up is set, Cheong takes third place

JOSEPH CHEONG TAKES THIRD PLACE IN WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

The duel is set.  It’s Jonathan Duhamel versus John Racener.

The crescendo of the November Nine reached its near-final furious finale when zig-zagging Duhamel eliminated Cheong on what turned out to be the final hand of Final Table — Day One.  The long 14-hour session included the elimination of seven players, leaving only Duhamel and Racener to compete in a heads-up duel for the world title.

The third-place finisher was former WSOP Circuit gold ring winner Joseph Cheong, from San Diego, CA.  He collected $4,130,049 in prize money, an astronomical consolation prize that still somehow failed to heal the fresh wounds of a poker pro with broken dreams.  Making the disappointment more painful, Cheong held the chip lead about an hour before busting out.  He lost the key late hands that destroyed what at one point was viewed as a potentially insurmountable advantage.

That sets up the heads-up stage of the world championship, coming up on Monday night.  It also concluded an extraordinary day (and night) filled with twists and turns, and several exciting moments.

The fourth-place finisher was Filippo Candio, from Sardinia, Italy.  As the first Italian player ever to make it to the Main Event Championship final table, Candio proudly collected $3,092,545.

The fifth-place finisher was Michael “the Grinder” Mizrachi, from Miami, FL.  Undisputedly the most famous and most accomplished of the final nine, Mizrachi suffered a blistering final hour when he went from chip leader to the rail, losing every key late hand of importance.  Mizrachi took some consolation in his payout, which amounted to $2332,992 in prize money.

The sixth-place finisher was John Dolan, from Bonita Springs, FL.  He ran card dead at the worst possible time, hopelessly falling victim to a bad run of cards in the later stages of play.  Dolan busted out when his bluff failed.  Nonetheless, he managed to scoop a monster-sized check from his initial $10,000 investment.  Dolan received $1,772,969 in prize money.

The seventh-place finisher was Jason Senti, from St. Louis Park, MN.  He began final table play with the shortest stack, but moved two spots up the money ladder.  Senti collected $1,356,720.

The eighth-place finisher was Matthew Jarvis, who took a terrible beat en route to a disappointing end result.  Jarvis was the victim of one of several astounding final table hands which resulted in a cyclone of emotional twists and turns and ultimately, chip lead changes.  Jarvis received $1,045,743 in prize money.

The ninth-place finisher was Soi Nguyen, from Santa Ana, CA.  The only amateur player among the final nine, Nguyen collected $811,823 in prize money — an incredible accomplishment considering this was his first time to cash in a major poker tournament.

The final duel of the Main Event is set to begin on Monday night.  Heads-up play will resume November 8th at 8 pm PST, when the final two survivors will play down to a winner.  Coverage of the final table will air in a two-hour telecast on Tuesday at 10 pm ET on ESPN.

The winner of this year’s WSOP Main Event, the second largest in the 40-year history of the WSOP with 7,319 entrants, will take home a staggering $8,944,310 in prize money.  He will also be presented with the most coveted achievement in all of poker — the World Series of Poker Main Event Championship gold bracelet.

So, who will become the 2010 world poker champion?

WSOP ME Final Table 2010 Fantastic Finish for Filippo (4th)

FANTASTIC FINISH FOR FILIPPO

The 2010 World Series of Poker Main Event final table — otherwise known as the “November Nine” — has crossed the midway point.  There are now more players out on the rail watching and wishing, than still remain seated in poker’s richest game.

The latest player to bust out was Italian poker pro Filippo Candio, from the Mediterranean island of Sardinia.  He joined fellow finalists Soi Nguyen (9th), Matthew Jarvis (8th), Jason Senti (7th), and John Dolan (6th) as outsiders now looking in – along with a capacity crowd packed inside the Penn and Teller Theater and a worldwide audience following all the action from Las Vegas.

Filippo was eliminated when his playing card: Kd playing card: Qd failed to connect to a final board that showed playing card: Ah playing card: 7d playing card: 2s playing card: 5h playing card: 4h.  Joseph Cheong held playing card: Ac playing card: 3c and ended up with a straight on the hand.The significance of becoming the first player in Italy to make it to a Main Event final table was not lost on the blossoming new tournament star.

I was very proud to represent my country and do things for poker in Italy,” Candio stated shortly after being eliminated.  “I am pleased with the way I played.  I think there are going to be many more players from my country who (do well) at the World Series.”

The last two hours has included a flurry of action, resulting a huge momentum shift.  Joseph Cheong now appears to be the player to beat as play becomes three-handed.
Play will continue all night until only two players remain.  Last year’s final table (first day) followed a similar pattern and concluded at 5:00 am.Heads-up play will resume on Monday, November 8th at 8 pm PST when the final two will play down to a winner.  Coverage of the final table will air in a two-hour telecast on Tuesday at 10 pm ET on ESPN.

The winner of this year’s Main Event, the second largest in the 40-year history of the WSOP with 7,319 entrants, will take home $8,944,310 in prize money.  He will also be presented with the most coveted achievement in all of poker — the World Series of Poker Main Event Championship gold bracelet.

Who will become the 2010 world poker champion?

WSOP Main Event 2010 Michael “the grinder” Mizrachi its out in 5th place!

GRINDER GONE!  MICHAEL MIZRACHI TAKES FIFTH IN WSOP FINALE
My personal favorite its out. 

The 2010 World Series of Poker Main Event final table — otherwise known as the “November Nine” — has crossed the midway point.  There are now more players out on the rail watching and wishing, than still remain seated in poker’s richest game.

The latest player to bust out was Michael “the Grinder” Mizrachi, from Miami, FL.  He was the most well-known and most highly-accomplished player of this year’s finalists.  Mizrachi busted out when his top pair (queens) fell to Jonathan Duhamel’s pocket aces.

The Grinder unwillingly joined former fellow finalists Soi Nguyen (9th), Matthew Jarvis (8th), Jason Senti (7th), and John Dolan (6th) as outsiders all looking in – along with a capacity crowd packed inside the Penn and Teller Theatre and a worldwide audience following all the action from Las Vegas.

The last 90 minutes has included a flurry of action, resulting in three chip-lead changes.  Mizrachi lost a huge pot when he came out on the wrong end of a coin flip holding pocket threes versus Jonathan Duhamel’s A-9.

Two nines hit the board, giving Duhamel more than 50 million in chips for the first time in several hours.  He had been the chip leader coming into the final table, then went south the last several hours.  Duhamel’s good fortune catapulted him into second place, behind Joseph Cheong, who regained his chip lead at Mizrachi’s expense.

With four players remaining, the chip leader is Joseph Cheong, from La Mirada, CA.

Play will continue all night until only two players remain.  Last year’s final table (first day) followed a similar pattern and concluded at 5:00 am.

WSOP Main Event 2010 John Dolan its out and we’re down to five

The latest player to walk the plank away from the 2010 World Series of Poker Main Event final table was John Dolan, from Bonita Springs, FL.  He received $1,772,959 in prize money.  Dolan was short stacked and moved all-in on a bluff attempt.  The bold move failed as Jonathan Duhamel called the raise and won what remained of Dolan’s stack, with pocket fours.

Table play has been aggressive up to this point.  However, cards have fallen in a manner which has produced only four eliminations after ten hours of play (minus 90 minutes taken for the dinner break).
Play will continue all night until only two players remain.  Last year’s final table (first day) followed a similar pattern and concluded at 5:00 am.
Heads-up play will resume on Monday, November 8th at 8 pm PST when the final two will play down to a winner.  Coverage of the final table will air in a two-hour telecast on Tuesday at 10 pm ET on ESPN.
The winner of this year’s Main Event, the second largest in the 40-year history of the WSOP with 7,319 entrants, will take home $8,944,310 in prize money.  He will also be presented with the most coveted achievement in all of poker — the World Series of Poker Main Event Championship gold bracelet.

Who will become the 2010 world poker champion?  Keep it here at WSOP.COM for all the latest news, chip counts, and photos from the grand finale to find out.  Be sure to tune in to ESPN’s telecast on Tuesday at 10 PM EST, to see how it all unfolded.

Life Poker Championship

Primer Torneo Nacional de Poker en la Capital de País.

La cosmopolita Ciudad de México será la sede de uno de los eventos más esperados por los apasionados al deporte mental, “el primer torneo nacional de poker en vivo, “LIFE POKER CHAMPIONSHIP”, que se realizará del 19 al 22 de agosto del presente año, con la participación de 300 jugadores del país”, anuncio Alexander Orrego, organizador del evento.

El torneo tendrá lugar en el reconocido Casino Life del Valle y contará con el apoyo de la marca internacional, especialista en el deporte metal del poker PokerStars.net.

Miles de participantes podrán ser parte del torneo a través de los casinos Life ubicados alrededor de la República Mexicana, E-motion Casinos o vía online, por medio de PokerStars.net, totalmente gratuito.

“La realización del primer torneo ‘Life Poker Championship’ es una gran noticia para todos los que nos gusta este deporte mental, deseábamos tener un evento en México y convivir con grandes figuras del poker, como lo es el campeón mundial Ángel Guillén”, afirmo Martha Herrera miembro del Team Pro Online de PokerStars.

El campeonato constará de 4 días de competencia, en el cuales, solo 90 participantes lograran pasar al día de semifinales y competir por uno de los 10 asientos de la gran final que se llevará a cabo el domingo 22 de agosto.

Jueves 19 de agosto 11:00 horas – Clasificación (100 participantes)
Viernes 20 de agosto 11:00 horas – Clasificación (200 participantes)
Sábado 21 de agosto 11:00 horas – Semifinales (90 participantes)
Domingo 22 de agosto 11:00 horas – Gran final (10 participantes)

Para realización del evento se utilizarán las mesas de poker electrónicas clase III y será el popular Texas Hold’em el juego que llevará al ganador a convertirse en el Primer Campeón Nacional Poker en México.

Y como ya es tradición los Torneos de Celebridades dentro de los eventos de PokerStars, no podía faltar la acción altruista de celebridades tanto del espectáculo como del deporte que se unirán para recaudar fondos dirigidos a la fundación Fernando Sánchez Mayáns, A. C., dedicada a ayudar a niños y jóvenes con discapacidad.

Fecha: 18 al 22 de Agosto de 2010
Lugar: Casino Life Del Valle en la Ciudad de México. Av. Insurgentes Sur No. 1288, Col. Del Valle. México, D.F.
Entrada: $10,000 + $1,000 Pesos
Premio: $1,000’000.00 (un millón de pesos 00/100 M.N.) bolsa garantizada.
Cupo limitado 350 aprox.

Reglas generales

1.- Deberás proporcionar una identificación con foto para registrarte y deberás tener al menos 18 años.
2.- Cada jugador deberá firmar un formulario de descargo para el LPC para participar.
3.- La dirección se reserva el derecho a permitir o rechazar suplentes, entradas de última hora o modificar los periodos de registro publicados a su discreción.
4.-Las decisiones del Director del torneo son definitivas e inapelables, en cualquier circunstancia o imprevisto.
5.-La dirección se reserva el derecho de modificar, cambiar o cancelar los torneos a su discreción.
6.-Las ciegas y los antes superiores a los publicados se incrementarán a discreción del Director del torneo.

Si decides pagar directamente el BUY-IN para participar en el torneo, puedes realizar el depósito en efectivo en HSBC o Bancomer.

En ambos casos, deberás enviar el comprobante del depósito o transferencia junto con una copia de su identificación al correo: ggarcia@pringsa.com

Banco: HSBC
Cuenta: 4038461323
Clabe: 021180040384613234
Beneficiario: Promociones e Inversiones de Guerrero S.A. de C.V.

Banco: BBVA Bancomer
Cuenta: 0150591181
Clabe: 012180001505911815
Beneficiario: Promociones e Inversiones de Guerrero S.A. de C.V.